Paso Robles, CA – Sept. 2, 2020      The temporary camping facility for homeless residents has been operational at the Borkey Flats site for a few weeks. The site has restrooms, showers, and a safe needle exchange program, and a safe parking area….. The City’s Community Action Team (CAT) has been visiting homeless encampments in the riverbed. They have visited 15-20 camps and informed individuals of the new camping site and of the city’s intent to clean up the riverbed to mitigate fire risk and protect water quality…… To date, three encampments have been cleaned up of all debris and waste products. The camping site has not seen high levels of utilization to date, but the city has seen a drop in fire activity since the CAT team has been active and cleanup has begun….. The city will need to move the Borkey Flats encampment in the winter given that it is in the flood plain, and continues to work with homeless service provider partners to identify long-term solutions…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER    …..     …..
Stanton, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The County of Orange and Jamboree Housing Corporation submitted three applications as co-applicants and in partnership with the City of Stanton under the State Homekey program, all located in the City of Stanton, for a total request of $28.1 million in funding…..   The County recently received word that the State reserved funding for both The Tahiti Motel and Stanton Inn and Suites applications….. Two of the motels identified for funds in the City of Stanton include The Stanton Inn and Suites, on Katella Avenue and the Tahiti Motel, on Beach Boulevard. A third motel is in negotiation with the motel owner, they say. By the end of the project, 132 new affordable homes will be available for those experiencing homelessness.   Although this does not yet represent an award from the State, it is one step closer to securing funding to make the Homekey program work…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..     …..  
Oxnard, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The Vagabond Inn in Oxnard could soon transition from an affordable hotel option to permanent supportive housing for 70 of the county’s homeless residents, thanks to a state funding effort that aims to house California’s most vulnerable homeless individuals….. The Vagabond Inn is under consideration for funding under Project Homekey, the next phase in the state’s efforts to protect homeless residents who are high-risk for COVID-19. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $600 million in funding for cities and counties to convert motels, hotels and other housing types into permanent housing…..  “This is an opportunity that allows us to both respond to COVID-19 and respond to homelessness and the long-term need to provide housing,” said Oxnard Housing Director Emilio Ramirez…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Sacramento, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Gov. Newsom said Wednesday that California is making an “unprecedented” effort to address homelessness, two days after lawmakers failed to pass a bill to massively increase housing production….. The governor said the state has placed more than 22,000 homeless Californians in 16,400 hotel and motel rooms amid the pandemic, and is giving cities and counties $600 million to purchase the rooms and convert them into permanent housing….. Local governments also got another $628 million in emergency homelessness aid….. “It’s self-evident that this has to be our top priority and it is,” said Newsom……   A bill heading to Newsom’s desk would create a state Office to End Homelessness, led by a new “homelessness czar.” But the governor said Wednesday he already has a homelessness czar — a seemingly fluid title, given that he’s used it to refer to six people in the past two years, including himself……      HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..
San Francisco, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Bay Area universities and homeless advocates released a report on Thursday revealing the various barriers homeless San Franciscans face when accessing housing…..  The report’s authors, the Coalition on Homelessness and researchers with the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State University and Santa Clara University surveyed 600 temporarily housed San Franciscans, with a focus on transgender people …..  Participants revealed inequities that homeless transgender people face to obtain housing, poor shelter conditions, crowded living spaces and strict curfews, created even more barriers to housing. Fifty-eight percent of participants said they would prefer a legal homeless camp with basic amenities like showers and toilets while 34 percent reported having substance abuse issues…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Paso Robles, CA – Sept. 2, 2020      The temporary camping facility for homeless residents has been operational at the Borkey Flats site for a few weeks. The site has restrooms, showers, and a safe needle exchange program, and a safe parking area….. The City’s Community Action Team (CAT) has been visiting homeless encampments in the riverbed. They have visited 15-20 camps and informed individuals of the new camping site and of the city’s intent to clean up the riverbed to mitigate fire risk and protect water quality…… To date, three encampments have been cleaned up of all debris and waste products. The camping site has not seen high levels of utilization to date, but the city has seen a drop in fire activity since the CAT team has been active and cleanup has begun….. The city will need to move the Borkey Flats encampment in the winter given that it is in the flood plain, and continues to work with homeless service provider partners to identify long-term solutions…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER    …..     …..
Sacramento, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Gov. Newsom said Wednesday that California is making an “unprecedented” effort to address homelessness, two days after lawmakers failed to pass a bill to massively increase housing production….. The governor said the state has placed more than 22,000 homeless Californians in 16,400 hotel and motel rooms amid the pandemic, and is giving cities and counties $600 million to purchase the rooms and convert them into permanent housing….. Local governments also got another $628 million in emergency homelessness aid….. “It’s self-evident that this has to be our top priority and it is,” said Newsom……   A bill heading to Newsom’s desk would create a state Office to End Homelessness, led by a new “homelessness czar.” But the governor said Wednesday he already has a homelessness czar — a seemingly fluid title, given that he’s used it to refer to six people in the past two years, including himself……      HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..
Stanton, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The County of Orange and Jamboree Housing Corporation submitted three applications as co-applicants and in partnership with the City of Stanton under the State Homekey program, all located in the City of Stanton, for a total request of $28.1 million in funding…..   The County recently received word that the State reserved funding for both The Tahiti Motel and Stanton Inn and Suites applications….. Two of the motels identified for funds in the City of Stanton include The Stanton Inn and Suites, on Katella Avenue and the Tahiti Motel, on Beach Boulevard. A third motel is in negotiation with the motel owner, they say. By the end of the project, 132 new affordable homes will be available for those experiencing homelessness.   Although this does not yet represent an award from the State, it is one step closer to securing funding to make the Homekey program work…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..     …..  
Oxnard, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The Vagabond Inn in Oxnard could soon transition from an affordable hotel option to permanent supportive housing for 70 of the county’s homeless residents, thanks to a state funding effort that aims to house California’s most vulnerable homeless individuals….. The Vagabond Inn is under consideration for funding under Project Homekey, the next phase in the state’s efforts to protect homeless residents who are high-risk for COVID-19. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $600 million in funding for cities and counties to convert motels, hotels and other housing types into permanent housing…..  “This is an opportunity that allows us to both respond to COVID-19 and respond to homelessness and the long-term need to provide housing,” said Oxnard Housing Director Emilio Ramirez…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
San Francisco, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Bay Area universities and homeless advocates released a report on Thursday revealing the various barriers homeless San Franciscans face when accessing housing…..  The report’s authors, the Coalition on Homelessness and researchers with the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State University and Santa Clara University surveyed 600 temporarily housed San Franciscans, with a focus on transgender people …..  Participants revealed inequities that homeless transgender people face to obtain housing, poor shelter conditions, crowded living spaces and strict curfews, created even more barriers to housing. Fifty-eight percent of participants said they would prefer a legal homeless camp with basic amenities like showers and toilets while 34 percent reported having substance abuse issues…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..

Why is Society Waging War on Persons Experiencing Homelessness?

A growing culture of hate is vexing homeless solutions

By: Tim Houchen
July 1, 2019 —

As the numbers of visibly homeless persons grows in Southern California, so does the frustration of residents in our communities most impacted by homelessness. As the frustration increases, so does a malevolent chorus of discord among some residents who are contributing to a growing diatribe of hatred towards persons experiencing homelessness.

And it is complicating solutions.

This growing hate can be witnessed in public protests from NIMBY’s every time a proposed location for a homeless shelter is established. We see it in the comments section of online news articles. Social media discussions are becoming a “front line” where homeless advocates battle hate speech and contradiction of known best-practices for ending homelessness. Public groups on Facebook created for discussing solutions are often sacked by public suggestions of incarceration, regional displacement and even mass annihilation.

Even more troublesome is the willingness of our society to accept rather than rebuke hate speech directed at homeless persons as normal behavior. Hateful speech is one thing, but more and more physical acts of violence are being perpetrated against homeless persons. Could it be that society’s contempt for homelessness is nudging the standards of acceptable hate speech towards hateful acts of physical violence against homeless persons carried out by homeless hate extremists?

This culture of hate must be dispelled. The process of eliminating hate for persons experiencing homelessness must begin in our communities. Our elected leaders and other officials are sworn to serve and protect our citizens equally whether they are housed or unhoused.

Lack of political will and perhaps personal bias of public officials towards homeless individuals is a contributing factor that influences the public perception of homelessness. What our leaders do and say sends signals to the public. We look to our leaders for guidance on social issues and often times we base our opinions on trust in their opinions. The messages sent by our local officials are influencing public opinion and are conflicting solutions to end homelessness in our communities.

While some positive steps have been taken to address homelessness recently in Orange County, there are still too many ways that our county and cities continue to dehumanize homeless persons by creating and enforcing laws that criminalize their homeless status. These laws place restrictions on sitting, sleeping and storing personal property in public spaces and encourage the belief that homeless persons are not human, and are unworthy of respect.

When dozens of sheriff’s deputies converge on a homeless encampment in full riot gear to evict homeless persons who have nowhere to go except the streets, the message sent to the public says, “Homeless people are dangerous criminals and are not worthy of living in our city.”

When a public official, whether it be a city council member or county supervisor, attends a town hall meeting on homelessness and is met by a hostile crowd, fomenting hatred and ranting suggestions of vigilantism and the use of force against homeless people, as has happened in the past. If that particular public official does not publicly denounce the actions there and then, in fact, doesn’t say a word, then they send a message that says, “I’m with you, brothers. Let’s gather our torches, pitchforks and AK-47’s and let’s get those lousy homeless bastards out of our city.”

On November 22, 2018, a man extradited from Arizona was sentenced to just three years behind bars for fatally stabbing a homeless man, Roy Thomas Emming, in Santa Ana in 1984. John William Zelinski, accepted a plea deal and was released one week later after getting credit for time served while he was awaiting trial. In this case one must ask, “is the value of a homeless life less than that of someone who is not homeless?”

 It is a grave concern that some of our leaders have created a toxic environment that could be used by some members of the public as internal justification for facilitating violent attacks against homeless people.

Will the time come when a sick and twisted member of our society commits a most vicious and violent attack on  homeless persons while thinking he is doing our society a favor, or has that time already arrived?

Beginning in 2011 and into 2012, a serial killer took the lives of four homeless men in Orange County. After his arrest the killer gave a detailed confession to Anaheim police investigators. Watch the video below and see why he killed the homeless men.

We are at a critical point in our efforts to end homelessness. Our Federal and State governments now share a common strategy of how homelessness can be ended. A brisk economy has allowed more funding than ever to be allocated to solutions.

Our communities must embrace a more collaborative effort and local governments need to align with other layers of government for the best results and we must embrace the “Housing First” philosophy in order to address visible homelessness in our communities.

There are still many people that are undecided on the issue of ending homelessness and homeless advocates are trying to relay a message of hope for homeless persons and for communities impacted by homelessness. Hate speech and rhetoric is interfering with the efforts of many homeless advocates to deliver the message of solutions that would benefit us all.

Many of our local governments accept State and Federal funding to end homelessness, but our officials fail to adequately support the strategies publicly, in fact they openly oppose them. These officials are sending the wrong messages to the public and are influencing the contempt for persons experiencing homelessness as a result.

It’s time to fight back against the hate that is preventing solutions and it’s time for more serious conversation about solutions without nasty, hateful and negative rhetoric. Please support the strategies adopted by our State and Federal governments.


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