Sacramento, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Gov. Newsom said Wednesday that California is making an “unprecedented” effort to address homelessness, two days after lawmakers failed to pass a bill to massively increase housing production….. The governor said the state has placed more than 22,000 homeless Californians in 16,400 hotel and motel rooms amid the pandemic, and is giving cities and counties $600 million to purchase the rooms and convert them into permanent housing….. Local governments also got another $628 million in emergency homelessness aid….. “It’s self-evident that this has to be our top priority and it is,” said Newsom……   A bill heading to Newsom’s desk would create a state Office to End Homelessness, led by a new “homelessness czar.” But the governor said Wednesday he already has a homelessness czar — a seemingly fluid title, given that he’s used it to refer to six people in the past two years, including himself……      HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..
Paso Robles, CA – Sept. 2, 2020      The temporary camping facility for homeless residents has been operational at the Borkey Flats site for a few weeks. The site has restrooms, showers, and a safe needle exchange program, and a safe parking area….. The City’s Community Action Team (CAT) has been visiting homeless encampments in the riverbed. They have visited 15-20 camps and informed individuals of the new camping site and of the city’s intent to clean up the riverbed to mitigate fire risk and protect water quality…… To date, three encampments have been cleaned up of all debris and waste products. The camping site has not seen high levels of utilization to date, but the city has seen a drop in fire activity since the CAT team has been active and cleanup has begun….. The city will need to move the Borkey Flats encampment in the winter given that it is in the flood plain, and continues to work with homeless service provider partners to identify long-term solutions…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER    …..     …..
Stanton, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The County of Orange and Jamboree Housing Corporation submitted three applications as co-applicants and in partnership with the City of Stanton under the State Homekey program, all located in the City of Stanton, for a total request of $28.1 million in funding…..   The County recently received word that the State reserved funding for both The Tahiti Motel and Stanton Inn and Suites applications….. Two of the motels identified for funds in the City of Stanton include The Stanton Inn and Suites, on Katella Avenue and the Tahiti Motel, on Beach Boulevard. A third motel is in negotiation with the motel owner, they say. By the end of the project, 132 new affordable homes will be available for those experiencing homelessness.   Although this does not yet represent an award from the State, it is one step closer to securing funding to make the Homekey program work…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..     …..  
Oxnard, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The Vagabond Inn in Oxnard could soon transition from an affordable hotel option to permanent supportive housing for 70 of the county’s homeless residents, thanks to a state funding effort that aims to house California’s most vulnerable homeless individuals….. The Vagabond Inn is under consideration for funding under Project Homekey, the next phase in the state’s efforts to protect homeless residents who are high-risk for COVID-19. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $600 million in funding for cities and counties to convert motels, hotels and other housing types into permanent housing…..  “This is an opportunity that allows us to both respond to COVID-19 and respond to homelessness and the long-term need to provide housing,” said Oxnard Housing Director Emilio Ramirez…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
San Francisco, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Bay Area universities and homeless advocates released a report on Thursday revealing the various barriers homeless San Franciscans face when accessing housing…..  The report’s authors, the Coalition on Homelessness and researchers with the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State University and Santa Clara University surveyed 600 temporarily housed San Franciscans, with a focus on transgender people …..  Participants revealed inequities that homeless transgender people face to obtain housing, poor shelter conditions, crowded living spaces and strict curfews, created even more barriers to housing. Fifty-eight percent of participants said they would prefer a legal homeless camp with basic amenities like showers and toilets while 34 percent reported having substance abuse issues…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Paso Robles, CA – Sept. 2, 2020      The temporary camping facility for homeless residents has been operational at the Borkey Flats site for a few weeks. The site has restrooms, showers, and a safe needle exchange program, and a safe parking area….. The City’s Community Action Team (CAT) has been visiting homeless encampments in the riverbed. They have visited 15-20 camps and informed individuals of the new camping site and of the city’s intent to clean up the riverbed to mitigate fire risk and protect water quality…… To date, three encampments have been cleaned up of all debris and waste products. The camping site has not seen high levels of utilization to date, but the city has seen a drop in fire activity since the CAT team has been active and cleanup has begun….. The city will need to move the Borkey Flats encampment in the winter given that it is in the flood plain, and continues to work with homeless service provider partners to identify long-term solutions…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER    …..     …..
Oxnard, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The Vagabond Inn in Oxnard could soon transition from an affordable hotel option to permanent supportive housing for 70 of the county’s homeless residents, thanks to a state funding effort that aims to house California’s most vulnerable homeless individuals….. The Vagabond Inn is under consideration for funding under Project Homekey, the next phase in the state’s efforts to protect homeless residents who are high-risk for COVID-19. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $600 million in funding for cities and counties to convert motels, hotels and other housing types into permanent housing…..  “This is an opportunity that allows us to both respond to COVID-19 and respond to homelessness and the long-term need to provide housing,” said Oxnard Housing Director Emilio Ramirez…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Sacramento, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Gov. Newsom said Wednesday that California is making an “unprecedented” effort to address homelessness, two days after lawmakers failed to pass a bill to massively increase housing production….. The governor said the state has placed more than 22,000 homeless Californians in 16,400 hotel and motel rooms amid the pandemic, and is giving cities and counties $600 million to purchase the rooms and convert them into permanent housing….. Local governments also got another $628 million in emergency homelessness aid….. “It’s self-evident that this has to be our top priority and it is,” said Newsom……   A bill heading to Newsom’s desk would create a state Office to End Homelessness, led by a new “homelessness czar.” But the governor said Wednesday he already has a homelessness czar — a seemingly fluid title, given that he’s used it to refer to six people in the past two years, including himself……      HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..
San Francisco, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Bay Area universities and homeless advocates released a report on Thursday revealing the various barriers homeless San Franciscans face when accessing housing…..  The report’s authors, the Coalition on Homelessness and researchers with the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State University and Santa Clara University surveyed 600 temporarily housed San Franciscans, with a focus on transgender people …..  Participants revealed inequities that homeless transgender people face to obtain housing, poor shelter conditions, crowded living spaces and strict curfews, created even more barriers to housing. Fifty-eight percent of participants said they would prefer a legal homeless camp with basic amenities like showers and toilets while 34 percent reported having substance abuse issues…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Stanton, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The County of Orange and Jamboree Housing Corporation submitted three applications as co-applicants and in partnership with the City of Stanton under the State Homekey program, all located in the City of Stanton, for a total request of $28.1 million in funding…..   The County recently received word that the State reserved funding for both The Tahiti Motel and Stanton Inn and Suites applications….. Two of the motels identified for funds in the City of Stanton include The Stanton Inn and Suites, on Katella Avenue and the Tahiti Motel, on Beach Boulevard. A third motel is in negotiation with the motel owner, they say. By the end of the project, 132 new affordable homes will be available for those experiencing homelessness.   Although this does not yet represent an award from the State, it is one step closer to securing funding to make the Homekey program work…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..     …..  

Housing Density Bonus and Reporting Changes for Local Agencies

Part 6: New California Housing Laws

By: JD Supra
October 17, 2019 —

As part of the 2019 housing package, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a number of bills modifying density bonus rules, and information and reporting rules. Each of these bills is designed to increase housing production by easing regulations on development or making information readily available to potential developers.

Density Bonus
Assembly Bill 1763 amends California’s density bonus law to authorize significant development incentives to encourage 100 percent affordable housing projects. In response to a need for housing for low- and moderate-income households, the bill allows up to 20 percent of the units to be available for moderate income households, while the remainder of the units must be affordable to lower income households. The affordability restrictions apply to both the base units and the extra units granted through the density bonus.

These 100 percent affordable housing projects can receive an 80 percent density bonus from the otherwise maximum allowable density on the site. If the project is within 1/2 mile of a major transit stop, the city may not apply any density limit to the project. In addition to the density bonus, qualifying projects will receive four regulatory concessions. And, if the project is within 1/2 mile of a major transit stop, it will also receive a height increase of up to three additional stories, or 33 feet. The 100 percent affordable housing projects are also not subject to any minimum parking requirements.

Essentially, this bill encourages 100 percent affordable housing projects to provide as many units as possible on the site, and the limits on project size come from other standards, such as maximum height limits and setbacks (which are also subject to any allowable deviations through the four available concessions). Under existing law, cities are already required to have an ordinance that implements the state density bonus law. Cities should update their density bonus ordinances to codify this new bonus for 100 percent affordable projects.

Information and Reporting Requirements
Under existing law, counties are required to establish a central inventory of all surplus governmental property located in the county. AB 1255 amends the Government Code to extend this obligation to cities. It requires that on or before Dec. 31 of each year, each county and city create an inventory of surplus land (land no longer necessary for the agency’s use) and excess land (land in excess of the agency’s foreseeable needs) within its jurisdiction. Upon request, the agencies are required to make the inventory available to a citizen, limited dividend corporation or nonprofit corporation free of charge. For each site identified in the inventory, the agency must provide a description of the parcel and its present uses, and report that information to the California Department of Housing and Community Development before April 1 of each year. HCD must then report that information to the Department of General Services for inclusion in an inventory of all state-owned parcels that are in excess of state needs.

Similar to AB 1255, Senate Bill 6 requires DGS to develop and host a publicly available database on its website that lists the “inventory sites” that local agencies have identified as suitable and available for residential development in their respective housing elements. Under existing law — including, specifically, Housing Element Law section 65583(a)(3) — these inventory sites are required to be included in each local agency’s housing element. However, SB 6 obligates local agencies to prepare their respective inventory sites consistent not only with existing law, but also with standards, form, and definitions adopted by HCD. SB 6 further authorizes HCD to adopt, amend and repeal these standards, forms, and definitions to implement Housing Element Law section 65583(a) .

Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, all agencies that amend or adopt their housing element must deliver to HCD, along with the copy of its adopted housing element or amendment, an electronic copy of their inventory sites. HCD is responsible for then furnishing the DGS with the list of inventory sites to be included in the database. DGS’ database will also include State lands determined or declared excess pursuant to Government Code section 11011.

AB 1483 creates more transparency requirements. Existing law requires public agencies to provide a development project applicant with a detailed list of the information that will be required from the applicant. Existing law also requires a local agency that establishes or increases a fee as a condition of a development project’s approval to determine a reasonable relationship between the fee’s use and the type of development project on which the fee is imposed. AB 1483 adds section 65940.1 to the Government Code to require that a city, county, or special district post on its website all of the following:

  1. a current schedule of fees, exactions and affordability requirements imposed by the agency that are applicable to a proposed housing development project (defined as a residential project, mixed used project or transitional or supportive housing project),
  2. all zoning ordinances and development standards, including an identification of the zoning ordinances and development standards applicable to each parcel,
  3. the list of information required from a development project applicant
  4. the current and five previous annual fee reports or annual financial reports and
  5. an archive of impact fee nexus studies or cost of service studies conducted by the public agency after Jan. 1, 2018.

 
The public agency must update this information within 30 days of any changes.

AB 1483 also amends the Health and Safety Code to add new requirements for HCD regarding its updates to the California Statewide Housing Plan, completed every 4 years. AB 1483 requires that HCD include in the next revision (due on or after Jan. 1), and each subsequent revision, a 10-year housing data strategy. This includes, among other things, an assessment of data submitted by annual reports, and a strategy to achieve more consistent terminology for housing data across the State. In establishing the data strategy, HCD is required to establish a workgroup that includes representatives from local governments, the Department of Technology and other groups.

Next Year
It should be noted that there were a number of housing-related bills that did not make it out of the Legislature, but may be back next year. The most well-known was SB 50, which would have created new incentives for developers to build apartments and condominiums near train and bus stations, even in areas zoned strictly for single-family homes. As proposed, it would waive or relax local minimum parking requirements and density restrictions for developers looking to build housing near train stations and “high-quality” bus stops. It also allows developers to build up to four-stories within 1/2 mile of a train station and up to five stories within 1/4 mile. SB 50 was converted to a 2-year bill and will be back in the process in January.

A second bill that was proposed but didn’t make it out of the Legislature was Assembly Constitutional Amendment 1. ACA 1 was the repeal of Article XXXIV. Article XXXIV requires a vote of the people before a local agency can provide financial support for an affordable housing project where the local agency restricts more than 49 percent of the units to be built. Although its future is less certain than SB 50, it is possible this bill will be reintroduced in the near future.

This article courtesy of JD Supra


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More articles for you —

Part 1: New California Housing Laws
Omnibus Housing Bill Adds Teeth to Housing Element Law Enforcement

Part 2: New California Housing Laws
Surplus Land Act Requirements Expand for Local Agencies

Part 3: New California Housing Laws
Tenant Protection Act Sets Statewide Rent Caps and Eviction Rules

Part 4: New California Housing Laws
SB 330 Limits Local Laws Over Housing Developments

Part 5: New California Housing Laws
California Paves Way for More ADUs

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