Stanton, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The County of Orange and Jamboree Housing Corporation submitted three applications as co-applicants and in partnership with the City of Stanton under the State Homekey program, all located in the City of Stanton, for a total request of $28.1 million in funding…..   The County recently received word that the State reserved funding for both The Tahiti Motel and Stanton Inn and Suites applications….. Two of the motels identified for funds in the City of Stanton include The Stanton Inn and Suites, on Katella Avenue and the Tahiti Motel, on Beach Boulevard. A third motel is in negotiation with the motel owner, they say. By the end of the project, 132 new affordable homes will be available for those experiencing homelessness.   Although this does not yet represent an award from the State, it is one step closer to securing funding to make the Homekey program work…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..     …..  
Sacramento, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Gov. Newsom said Wednesday that California is making an “unprecedented” effort to address homelessness, two days after lawmakers failed to pass a bill to massively increase housing production….. The governor said the state has placed more than 22,000 homeless Californians in 16,400 hotel and motel rooms amid the pandemic, and is giving cities and counties $600 million to purchase the rooms and convert them into permanent housing….. Local governments also got another $628 million in emergency homelessness aid….. “It’s self-evident that this has to be our top priority and it is,” said Newsom……   A bill heading to Newsom’s desk would create a state Office to End Homelessness, led by a new “homelessness czar.” But the governor said Wednesday he already has a homelessness czar — a seemingly fluid title, given that he’s used it to refer to six people in the past two years, including himself……      HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..
San Francisco, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Bay Area universities and homeless advocates released a report on Thursday revealing the various barriers homeless San Franciscans face when accessing housing…..  The report’s authors, the Coalition on Homelessness and researchers with the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State University and Santa Clara University surveyed 600 temporarily housed San Franciscans, with a focus on transgender people …..  Participants revealed inequities that homeless transgender people face to obtain housing, poor shelter conditions, crowded living spaces and strict curfews, created even more barriers to housing. Fifty-eight percent of participants said they would prefer a legal homeless camp with basic amenities like showers and toilets while 34 percent reported having substance abuse issues…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Paso Robles, CA – Sept. 2, 2020      The temporary camping facility for homeless residents has been operational at the Borkey Flats site for a few weeks. The site has restrooms, showers, and a safe needle exchange program, and a safe parking area….. The City’s Community Action Team (CAT) has been visiting homeless encampments in the riverbed. They have visited 15-20 camps and informed individuals of the new camping site and of the city’s intent to clean up the riverbed to mitigate fire risk and protect water quality…… To date, three encampments have been cleaned up of all debris and waste products. The camping site has not seen high levels of utilization to date, but the city has seen a drop in fire activity since the CAT team has been active and cleanup has begun….. The city will need to move the Borkey Flats encampment in the winter given that it is in the flood plain, and continues to work with homeless service provider partners to identify long-term solutions…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER    …..     …..
Oxnard, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The Vagabond Inn in Oxnard could soon transition from an affordable hotel option to permanent supportive housing for 70 of the county’s homeless residents, thanks to a state funding effort that aims to house California’s most vulnerable homeless individuals….. The Vagabond Inn is under consideration for funding under Project Homekey, the next phase in the state’s efforts to protect homeless residents who are high-risk for COVID-19. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $600 million in funding for cities and counties to convert motels, hotels and other housing types into permanent housing…..  “This is an opportunity that allows us to both respond to COVID-19 and respond to homelessness and the long-term need to provide housing,” said Oxnard Housing Director Emilio Ramirez…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Paso Robles, CA – Sept. 2, 2020      The temporary camping facility for homeless residents has been operational at the Borkey Flats site for a few weeks. The site has restrooms, showers, and a safe needle exchange program, and a safe parking area….. The City’s Community Action Team (CAT) has been visiting homeless encampments in the riverbed. They have visited 15-20 camps and informed individuals of the new camping site and of the city’s intent to clean up the riverbed to mitigate fire risk and protect water quality…… To date, three encampments have been cleaned up of all debris and waste products. The camping site has not seen high levels of utilization to date, but the city has seen a drop in fire activity since the CAT team has been active and cleanup has begun….. The city will need to move the Borkey Flats encampment in the winter given that it is in the flood plain, and continues to work with homeless service provider partners to identify long-term solutions…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER    …..     …..
Oxnard, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The Vagabond Inn in Oxnard could soon transition from an affordable hotel option to permanent supportive housing for 70 of the county’s homeless residents, thanks to a state funding effort that aims to house California’s most vulnerable homeless individuals….. The Vagabond Inn is under consideration for funding under Project Homekey, the next phase in the state’s efforts to protect homeless residents who are high-risk for COVID-19. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $600 million in funding for cities and counties to convert motels, hotels and other housing types into permanent housing…..  “This is an opportunity that allows us to both respond to COVID-19 and respond to homelessness and the long-term need to provide housing,” said Oxnard Housing Director Emilio Ramirez…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..
Stanton, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     The County of Orange and Jamboree Housing Corporation submitted three applications as co-applicants and in partnership with the City of Stanton under the State Homekey program, all located in the City of Stanton, for a total request of $28.1 million in funding…..   The County recently received word that the State reserved funding for both The Tahiti Motel and Stanton Inn and Suites applications….. Two of the motels identified for funds in the City of Stanton include The Stanton Inn and Suites, on Katella Avenue and the Tahiti Motel, on Beach Boulevard. A third motel is in negotiation with the motel owner, they say. By the end of the project, 132 new affordable homes will be available for those experiencing homelessness.   Although this does not yet represent an award from the State, it is one step closer to securing funding to make the Homekey program work…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..     …..  
Sacramento, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Gov. Newsom said Wednesday that California is making an “unprecedented” effort to address homelessness, two days after lawmakers failed to pass a bill to massively increase housing production….. The governor said the state has placed more than 22,000 homeless Californians in 16,400 hotel and motel rooms amid the pandemic, and is giving cities and counties $600 million to purchase the rooms and convert them into permanent housing….. Local governments also got another $628 million in emergency homelessness aid….. “It’s self-evident that this has to be our top priority and it is,” said Newsom……   A bill heading to Newsom’s desk would create a state Office to End Homelessness, led by a new “homelessness czar.” But the governor said Wednesday he already has a homelessness czar — a seemingly fluid title, given that he’s used it to refer to six people in the past two years, including himself……      HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER…..     …..
San Francisco, CA – Sept. 3, 2020     Bay Area universities and homeless advocates released a report on Thursday revealing the various barriers homeless San Franciscans face when accessing housing…..  The report’s authors, the Coalition on Homelessness and researchers with the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State University and Santa Clara University surveyed 600 temporarily housed San Franciscans, with a focus on transgender people …..  Participants revealed inequities that homeless transgender people face to obtain housing, poor shelter conditions, crowded living spaces and strict curfews, created even more barriers to housing. Fifty-eight percent of participants said they would prefer a legal homeless camp with basic amenities like showers and toilets while 34 percent reported having substance abuse issues…..     HOMELESS PERSPECTIVE CALIFORNIA TICKER     …..     …..

Who Wins When San Diego Adds Granny Flats and Tiny Homes? Residents or Tourists?

This is an example of a moveable tiny home sold by Zen Tiny Homes in Encinitas. These units are now legal in San Diego if rented for at least 30 days. (Courtesy of Zen Tiny Homes)

By: Cody Dulaney
August 26, 2020 —

San Diego continues to encourage adding small units to single-family properties in a push to increase the affordable housing stock, but where city officials struggle is in keeping these units from becoming short-term vacation rentals.

Even with the steps they are now taking, they won’t catch those who operate underground and rent in areas where short-term rentals are restricted.

The need for this kind of housing is great. A report last year from the California Housing Partnership says San Diego County needs more than 136,000 affordable rental units — which is considered $1,600 or less a month for one person — to meet the current demand. 

To bridge that gap and increase affordable housing, the city’s elected leaders have made it easier and cheaper for property owners to add granny flats to their lots. In return, the owners who received permits after 2017 have to rent them for 30 days or more. They can’t be used as short-term rentals.

And now, the city is allowing property owners to park a tiny home on wheels in their yards. The City Council voted unanimously this month to legalize these movable tiny homes, and Mayor Kevin Faulconer approved it. As with granny flats, the tiny homes aren’t to become short-term rentals.

An inewsource investigation in January found the city wasn’t doing much of anything to make sure granny flats — officially called accessory dwelling units or companion units — weren’t being rented out on Airbnb, Vrbo and other short-term rental websites. 

Our investigation involved comparing two sets of city data — tax certificates that allow someone to rent a property for less than 30 days and granny flat permits issued after 2017.

What inewsource uncovered was the two departments responsible for keeping this public data weren’t sharing the information with each other, so neither knew that several owners who got financial breaks to build granny flats as new affordable housing had converted them to short-term rentals.

In February, after our story published, the City Treasurer’s Office began sharing a monthly list of addresses that can be rented for less than 30 days with Development Services, which issues granny flat permits. That allows them to catch those who might be violating the rental law.

So far, code enforcement has opened cases against about 30 property owners, city spokesperson Scott Robinson said. The list includes some inewsource identified. 

Code enforcement’s goal is gaining compliance, Robinson said, so staff first tries to work with the property owners. If unsuccessful, they could be assessed daily fines of up to $10,000 for a maximum of $400,000.

Short-term rentals lucrative for owners

This system, however, does little to catch property owners who might be illegally operating short-term rentals, which includes everything from granny flats issued permits since 2017 to some apartment buildings.

As of July, the City Treasurer’s Office maintains a list of 6,669 active tax certificates for properties that are rented for less than 30 days and pay a daily transient occupancy tax — or room tax. These could be a Best Western motel or a granny flat in someone’s backyard.

But nearly 9,200 San Diego addresses were posted on Airbnb with less than 30 days as a minimum stay, according to data collected in mid-June by Inside Airbnb, a tech start-up that gathers information from Airbnb listings.

Although Airbnb collects room taxes from guests and pays the city in a lump sum, the city doesn’t check if those units are allowed to be used as short-term rentals.


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Save San Diego Neighborhoods, which lobbies for vacation rental regulations, is skeptical that granny flats and moveable tiny homes will make any sizable difference in the city’s housing shortage. These units will wind up benefitting tourists on vacation more than San Diegans looking for affordable housing, said John Thickstun, a board member with the group.

“If (property owners) can make two or three times as much money renting it out as a short-term vacation rental, that’s what they’re going to do. And when you have a city run by people that don’t enforce the law, this is what happens,” Thickstun said.

Inside Airbnb’s data shows an average night’s stay for a San Diego unit with one bed costs $138, which adds up to $4,140 if the unit is booked every day for a month. That compares to an average monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment in San Diego of $1,795, according to Zumper, a San Francisco-based apartment listing marketplace.

City Attorney Mara Elliott has said short-term rentals are illegal in San Diego’s residential zones, but city officials don’t enforce that. The City Council also has failed at attempts to impose strict regulations on short-term rentals.

Today, the city sets no restrictions on how long a primary dwelling in a single-family residential zone can be rented, but those in multi-family zones are limited to a minimum of seven days. Meanwhile, granny flats permitted since 2017 and moveable tiny homes on single-family lots have a 30-day minimum.

Caution urged against overregulation

Councilmember Scott Sherman was behind the city allowing tiny homes on wheels and including them with laws regulating granny flats. He also thinks the city can keep them from being turned into short-term rentals.

During the council meeting when the tiny homes were approved, Sherman called them a “small bite of a large elephant” when it comes to increasing the affordable housing stock in San Diego.

Sherman has said the city’s lack of regulation on short-term rentals has made San Diego the “wild, wild West.

Even so, he told inewsource in an email: “Moveable tiny homes are a great option that naturally increases affordable housing at no cost to taxpayers and I am confident the Mayor and city staff can effectively enforce the ordinance.”

Faulconer declined to comment on what more the city can do to prevent housing intended for San Diegans from becoming rooms for tourists.

Two San Diego real estate experts, Norm Miller and Gary London, say granny flats and tiny homes do provide a benefit by adding to the region’s housing supply. The units also increase affordability — for the property owner with additional income and for the tenant with relatively low rents for small spaces.

But whether people should be allowed to turn them into short-term rentals comes down to property rights, said Miller, a University of San Diego real estate finance professor. People should not be prevented from renting out units on their property just because neighbors object.

“At the same time, we do need more housing, so I can see putting some minimum rental terms on the units,” he said in an email.

London, a real estate analyst with London Moeder Advisors, said he believes the vast majority of people who have these units rent to long-term tenants, so he doesn’t see the need for restrictions on short-term rentals. 

“I think we have to tread very carefully in overregulating (granny flats) for short-term vacation rentals, because there’s a lot of good that comes from them as well,” London said. Vacation platforms like Airbnb and Vrbo benefit the economy and don’t significantly impact the hotel sector, he said.

And unlike apartment developments, London said, adding these types of units to existing lots is rarely seen or felt by neighbors because they’re in people’s backyards.

If there are problems with loud partying or parking violations, he said, “perhaps we need to concentrate our efforts in better enforcing the rules that are already on the books.

This article courtesy of inewsource


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